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I Don't Need Governance (Or lower ediscovery costs or access to my content or . . . )

So you think information governance boring and OK to ignore? Then you want to continually recreate content, pay more for ediscovery, and not be able to maximize your ability to gain insight about your business and customers from your information. Johnny Lee explains why you need...

Bryant Duhon's profile image

Blog Entry
Challenges of Running an e-Discovery Team

Key relationships should be developed with the following:- Regulators External and Internal Legal Counsel Compliance HR Information Risk Management technology This will (probably) result in closer co-operation, less duplication of effort, reduced costs and a quicker response time

Roger Poole's profile image

Blog Entry
How to Avoid Vendor-lockup in Email Archiving and Enterprise Information Archiving

This can result in vendor lockup or huge specialized conversion costs...” Estimating (future) migration costs In order to properly estimate future migration costs, many factors must be included

Johannes Scholtes's profile image

Blog Entry
Records Management Programmes

1/ Improve efficiency (reduce incidents of "lost" records for example) 2/ Reduce costs - reduce storage and service costs both internal and external 3/ Minimise litigation risks and respond to regulatory/legal enquiries in a timely manner 4/ Because you have to!

Roger Poole's profile image

Blog Entry
Big Data and The Crucial Need for Information Governance

And all that Big Data piling up has real costs: The burden of massive stores of information has increased storage costs dramatically, caused overloaded systems to fail, and increased legal discovery costs. Further, the longer that data is kept, the more likely that it will need to be migrated to newer computing platforms, driving up conversion costs; and legally, there is the risk that somewhere in that mountain of data an organization stores is a piece of information that represents a significant legal liability

Robert Smallwood's profile image

Blog Entry
Why the RMA is DEAD

Transitory documents and email are destroyed according to published policy and therefore the organization benefits from lower storage and discovery costs. Potentially HUGE cost savings are realized through lower discovery costs, lower sanctions and fines, and via the ramifications of NOT failing audits due to lack of documentation

Mark Mandel's profile image

Blog Entry
2011 Industry Predictions (Part 1)

End users are learning that a little planning and prudent use of technology can go a long way to reducing litigation costs in the future...This has huge savings in terms of storage, back-up, system performance, litigation costs, and more

Dan Elam's profile image

Blog Entry
Which Part of E-Discovery Should You Fix First?

Which e-discovery stages will reduce your costs most effectively?...It’s easy to show how using content management, email archiving, and records management to reduce your volume of ESI will lead directly to decreased costs and risk

Richard Medina's profile image

Blog Entry
The Lost Art of Data Destruction: An overlooked key to records management and e-discovery

The impact of these costs is particularly noticeable to in-house legal teams and support staff who are often at the front lines of any e-discovery activities occurring within their organizations. Even though advanced information access technologies are available to help minimize these costs, many legal professionals do not yet have these tools in place, and for those that do, they are still confronted with the primary challenge to effectively managing e-discovery costs: the continued addiction throughout organizations to keeping and storing too much electronic data

Johannes Scholtes's profile image