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Digital Signatures: We’re Open, They’re Closed

Open Standards The real benefits come from open standards, standards that have multiple implementations from competing companies. What do open standards for digital signatures mean for you?

Larry Kluger's profile image

Blog Entry
StratML Public & Private Sectors Uses - White Paper (2013)

Going the open-standards route is logical if an entity plans to properly deploy a large-scale IT solution...Regarding open-standards, machine-readable formats like StratML can better adapt to changes and promote a true agnostic IT landscape

R. Russell Ruggiero's profile image

Blog Entry
Have We Hit the Era of Peak Apps? Rethinking the Mobile First Imperative with HTML5 and Responsive Design

I moderated a panel discussion on the unique challenges of non-profits when deploying a web CMS, as well as presenting on the topic of open standards as a driver for business. The “Open Standards and Open Source Mean Open for Business” slides are now available on SlideShare

Cheryl McKinnon's profile image

Blog Entry
Are Digital Signatures legal?

Open, standard digital signatures give both signers and relying parties superb defenses anytime there is a dispute

Larry Kluger's profile image

Blog Entry
LTFS 1: Linear Tape File System - The Brilliant Breakthrough

The LTFS Launch Richmond and his then manager were pushing to move the LTFS specification into the open source space through the Linear Tape-Open (LTO) (a consortium of technology companies seeking to develop open standards for linear tape). With the many proprietary formats for tape that exist, Richmond and his manager pushed for LTFS to be moved towards an open standard, believing that companies would be less willing to buy into LTFS if it were released as a proprietary format since it would force those companies to work exclusively with IBM

Nick Inglis's profile image

Blog Entry
CMIS – Redefining the Content Interoperability Space

CMIS and its inevitability With an increase in complex structures through which enterprise content is managed, open standards like CMIS is the only way through which these challenges can be addressed

Abhishek Rastogi's profile image

Blog Entry
Ed Snowden and the different types of signatures

Standard digital signatures with hardware-protected certificates and self-signed organizational certificates This is a very good system since it provides you with the power and trust of open standard digital signatures

Larry Kluger's profile image

Blog Entry
Digital Signatures are forever?

” No. Open standard digital signature technology (we'll talk more in the future about what that really means) is modeled after traditional pen and ink signature technology, including signature authenticity issues

Larry Kluger's profile image

Blog Entry
SharePoint, Workflow, and Digital Signatures in 3 Pictures

The most important characteristics of digital signatures are the following: They are based on open, standards-based technology They are integrated with standard directory systems (AD, others) They have productized integration with desktop applications (like MS Office), ECM systems, workflow and BPM tools, mobile devices, and other applications They can address both document-centric and data-centric signature applications I’ve obviously just scratched the surface here

Richard Medina's profile image