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The Devil's Triangle

And one final reference from a presentation by Bob Lawhorn of CAI in March 2010 about the causes of challenged projects: Poorly defined applications (miscommunication between business and IT) contribute to a 66% project failure rate, costing U.S. businesses at least $30 billion every year (Forrester Research) 60% – 80% of project failures can be attributed directly to poor requirements gathering, analysis, and management (Meta Group) 50% are rolled back out of production (Gartner) 40% of problems are found by end users (Gartner) 25% – 40% of all spending on projects is wasted as a result of re-work (Carnegie Mellon) Up to 80% of budgets are consumed fixing self-inflicted problems (Dynamic Markets Limited 2007 Study) If we agree, for the sake of argument, that the software is not typically the problem, that leaves us with the other two corners of this triangle – the customer or the system integrator

Bud Porter-Roth's profile image

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Why giving the users what they want is not enough - the Importance of communication

As you are all most likely aware, giving the users what they want is not the right thing. Why? Because, often, the users don’t know really what they want. Consider the following example: A large restaurant chain has restaurants across the globe. Each restaurant needs to...

Mark Owen's profile image

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You Can’t Always Get What You Want

But, you can probably get what you really need . Provided you are a business user with a good business analyst on your project team. And you don’t get distracted by sparkly technology thingies. My favorite illustration of failure in the “get requirements….deliver on...

Monica Crocker's profile image

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How should a “Perfect” Search project be run?

” Ken suggested using an Agile/Scrum approach for the analysis of what the client needed as well as the development of the search UI...#requirements #useracceptance #scrum #project #agile #analysis #Search

Mark Owen's profile image

Blog Entry
SharePoint as a Service and a Solution (SPaaS)

Taking that further and interacting with the globalization of the Cloud, we provide various services to shape these solutions for the best benefit of the organization, including: Detailed environment assessment and analysis to determine what you have and how you use it Architectural planning and design to meet both technical and business aspects of information management and governance Customization and solution building for meeting specific and often unique needs for the organization Knowledge transfer and understanding for building adoption tools and training Ongoing levels of support for information workers, developers, designers, administrators, and business leaders Integration and hybridization with related technologies and globalized systems Capacity and performance analysis and tuning SharePoint-as-a-Service reinforces what the platform was originally meant to do: a ct as the foundation for integrating the organizational technologies and information stores into seamless, transparent systems as solutions

Errin O'Connor's profile image

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Big Data Needs Solid Requirements

We’ve even got some new stuff we can play around with thanks to social media, text analytics, sentiment analysis, etc

Chris Walker's profile image

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SharePoint 2010 Upgrade Options, Considerations & Best Practices

While the new features may be very attractive, it makes good business sense to do the requisite cost/benefit/risk analysis to determine how big an effort the upgrade will be and to try to ascertain the ROI for your organization

David Kruglov's profile image

Blog Entry
Why ECM Projects Cost More Than Expected

This is not to say vendors will take advantage of the situation but is to say when a vendor is doing requirements analysis and development for a new application, it is difficult to determine beforehand what problems are out there – the vendor is in discovery mode and you are paying the vendor to do your homework

Bud Porter-Roth's profile image