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Blog Entry
Approaching Retention Schedules Without Getting Pricked

I can hear you saying “we develop Retention Schedules to determine how long we should keep Records generated/processed/retained by ourselves&rdquo

Roger Poole's profile image


Blog Entry
Are You Using Your Records Retention Schedule?

This blog is the first part of a series that asks the questions, raises some issues and maybe answers a few questions about the use of a Records Retention Schedule. When your senior management said “we must have a Records Retention Schedule (RRS)” did you feel a sigh of relief?

Helen Streck's profile image

Blog Entry
Retention Schedules Represent MORE than Legal Requirements – Even in ERM

The Retention Schedule, of course, takes into account applicable regulatory requirements. Final retention periods in the schedule, however, may be longer than any regulatory retention requirements because they are based on many factors (depending upon the records and function)



Blog Entry
Big Bucket Approach – How's The View?

Fewer retention category choices (due to bigger, fewer retention buckets) in a retention schedule can lead to more consistent records management compliance as long as the risks of potentially longer retention periods are taken into account. Big bucket retention schedules (100-150 record series/retention categories for an enterprise) are more cost effective to maintain and increase filing accuracy for both manual and automatic classification

Susan Cisco's profile image

Blog Entry
Setting the Stage for Automatic Disposition

Organizations invest significant human and financial resources in developing and updating record retention schedules. What I don’t see is a follow-up effort to implement the retention schedule. In a recent project SMEs asked, “What’s the point of updating the retention schedule if retention is not being implemented, and documents are not disposed?

Susan Cisco's profile image

Blog Entry
Make RM Simpler

Start with the retention and legal hold processes: For records, streamline your retention schedule to 50-100 record series/buckets . Julie Gable, Carol Brock, and others (including me) promulgate the benefits of applying the big bucket approach to retention schedules

Susan Cisco's profile image


Blog Entry
The State of the Art in Records Management – Part One

In the past, a record was “declared” once its business process was completed, and the Records Retention Schedule defined how this static record was to be filed, stored, and retained. File Plans and Retention Schedules were based on a paper paradigm, focusing on how to organize boxes so that they could be accessioned, archived, and dispositioned effectively

Mark Mandel's profile image