AIIM Open Forum

1.  How to convince your org to used Shared Services across departments?

Posted 10 days ago
Today's aiim webinar had a panel of IT/ECM executives from two premier end user organizations. AIIM's John Mancini led the discussion as they explored lessons learned in over three decades of ECM at massive scale. (http://info.aiim.org/getting-strategic -- the replay will be available by the end of this week if you missed it)

Someone from the NIH asked the following question during the talk -- how would you answer this question?

"How do you get your organization/department/agency to use shared services as opposed to specific services if the organizations are very diverse."

------------------------------
Theresa Resek
Director, Webinars, Podcasts
AIIM
------------------------------


2.  RE: How to convince your org to used Shared Services across departments?

Posted 10 days ago
At General Services Administration, we invoke shared services across business lines all the time.  Whether it is contracting services, personnel-related, or IT-related the formula is often the same:

1.  Identify common problems that need solving (things that aren't working, things that cost a lot to maintain, things that are intensively people process dependent, for instance).

2.  Identify common field names across the two areas (for instance, everybody has an employee id, or some sort of unique identifier), and common process needs (such as routing something for approval by a higher level person), and common reports (such as status reports, or transaction logs, or compiled cost reports).

3.  Start with a small thing and build incrementally.  Pick a simple thing that may have a high impact.

4.  On the cultural side of things, you'll be challenging people in their comfort zones, so be gentle-but-firm that it is not an adoption/adaptation of one way over another, but a building a common solution to save both groups time, money, aggravation, and inaccuracies/inconsistencies.

5.  As always, report out on progress, but try to work with a group no more than 5 to 7 people to get small work done and build up to other services.  Too many cooks spoil the meal with project grievance air time, politicizing the process, coordinating project processes over accomplishing something, and unproductive meetings.

6. When you get to a significant milestone, discuss what you learned and what you would do differently in the future.  And then build on it as you grow that shared service.

Dave

------------------------------
Dave Simmons
Senior Records Officer and Knowledge Management Specialist
U.S. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
------------------------------



3.  RE: How to convince your org to used Shared Services across departments?

Posted 8 days ago
David Simmons@OMB re #3. in light of #4.

3.  Start with a small thing and build incrementally.  Pick a simple thing that may have a high impact.

Alphabetical Order is a pre-literacy skill, that is, somewhere age 3-7 you learn your ABC's.  When Uncle Sam picks you out of a sea of fresh faces, he assumes that.  He also assumes you have learned to manipulate federated data sets.  Whoa, where'd that come from ?

US Postal Codes are a federated (federal) set. The data base originated in 1754 when Ben Franklin Photo-Shopped and published the first four Codes (see: "Join, or Die" at libraries everywhere).   Since that time, it has been impossible for anyone who knows their ABC's to mistake the meaning of (NJ, NY, NC, SC).

Not that all sorts haven't tried ...  There is a side-by-side list of 2 digit State Codes which impart another ordering all together.  The reason is that the full possible set [AA .. ZZ] Franklin was using because he did not have all the name assignments can not fit in a less than 3 digit number - [001 .. 676].

The conversion formula to the "true" (numerical) Area Code is:
Area Code = sprintf("%03d",eval( (26 * (ord("{left}") - 64)) + (ord("{right}") - 64) - 26 ));

Example: District of Columbia = DC = 081
Example: Delaware = DE = 083


In a file listing of reports, file names sorted by either Postal Code or Area Code are both out of order, but not for the same reason and coherent (they fail in the same way).  Everyone is better off with Iconic File Names (Tokens) like "Alabama" , Alaska or "District_of_Columbia".

Small thing, no ? At some point I may have to take exception to your "gentle-but-firm" rule *:(( crying

Gannon J. Dick








'